A coerced member of the House-Elf Liberation Front and the Society for the Protection of Elfish Welfare.

casuallyconflicted:

theticklishpear:

It’s the first week of October, the very beginning of the official planning month for NaNoWriMo! When I asked if you guys would be interested in some posts this month, I received more likes than responses, and several reblogs without comments, so I’m going to assume those mean you’re alright with it. Let’s get started, then!

What is NaNoWriMo anyway?

It stands for National Novel Writing Month. The project started in 1999 in the San Francisco Bay Area with 21 people writing with utter abandon in July. This year the project will turn sixteen with more than 310,000 participants, and is run by the same people, just with a non-profit status, a global reach, and a branch for K-12 classrooms called the Young Writers Program.

But what do you do during NaNoWriMo?

Though the project held its first challenge in July, it has since been moved to the month of November. Starting on the 1st and ending at 11:59 PM on the 30th, participants attempt to write 50,000 words of novel. With the website to help you track your progress, verify your word count, and give you forums to meet people and procrastinate terribly, there’s a huge support system in place for writers who may not have support in those surrounding them in every day life.

How long have you been doing it?

I believe I first heard about the event from casuallyconflicted, whom I sat next to in 8th grade. (omg we’re old now) He’s an amazing writer that I looked up to enough to create the first creative writing club that school had ever had, and he was my most constant attendee. I tried NaNo that year and failed miserably, finishing with less than 7,000 words. I’ve moved several times since then (and actually I’m certain he has, too), and I’ve participated ever since. From 2003-2014, there have only been two years that I have not written a truly terrible book in the month of November, and those were due to starting college and several interpersonal issues going on at the time. This year, I’ll be giving it my best try with a new, full-time work position, so I’ll need your encouragement sometimes, too.

What’s your story?

After completing the core classes required for graduation in college, I began my creative writing emphasis courses, which I had been looking forward to the entire time I sat through math and computer programming classes and all the other terrible things I took. I always excelled in creative writing courses in high school, and I knew these would be just as enjoyable. During my fiction course, we were given an assignment to write a 10-20 page complete short story. I ended up with a story I felt extraordinarily confident about, confident in the character, confident (mostly) in the execution, everything. It came back as an F. My professor, a multi-published author, pulled me aside after class and said, “I could not grade this as following the assignment’s guidelines. You were asked to write a complete story. This is an excerpt. This story isn’t done. You need to write the rest of it. I need to read the rest of it.” That’s how I ended up with my current passion, the Moonwater Series. I wrote book one, Crystal Combat, in 2011; book two, Daelysian Dreams, in 2012; and the first half of book three, The Archives of Baellor’da, during last year’s event.

Come join me as I muddle through the second half of book three this year! My username is Emea, and I welcome any and all who would like to add me as a writing buddy. Nothing is better than writing with friends.

Creative writing club with Ms. Messick feels like so long ago. Damn, we are old. T.T

You’ve apparently won more times than I have. I’ve won three times in the past, last year with The Traveler’s Seal, and two cringeworthy novels in high school (Calendar Killers, and Project Utopia).

But this year I’m going to be kicking NaNo in the face with Jealous of the Plague, which everyone can follow through the Hazelwood tag at the top of my page. I’ll be laying a lot of groundwork throughout the month of October so on November First I can just jump into the stories I really want to tell.

If anyone else wants to join in on the fun with us, add me on the Nano website, or send me a message.

We’re all in this together, guys. Have fun and godspeed.

I have been fortunate to cross the finish line every time except the first year, which, okay, I was 13, so, I mean, I can’t blame me. I hate every single one of the novels I wrote up until Crystal Combat, so I understand what you mean.

Everybody should go check out his stuff—A+, really great. I’m excited to reconnect and get this party started this year! I am currently reorienting myself to where I left off and getting familiarized with my plot board (look forward to an article about that beauty!) and getting all geared up. I hope some more people join in! It’s gonna be great.

carrotsforferrets:

people (and bethesda, jesus christ) tend to forget that according to the lore, there are multiple types of Khajiiti. We only typically see the Suthay-Rhats, but Khajit can be born with multiple levels of feline appearance dependent on the moon cycle they are born under. On one end of the spectrum you have some Khajiit who look practically like Bosmer with cat whiskers, and on the other end you have Khajiit who legit just look like housecats but still have sentience and intelligence. For instance, this would be considered to be a perfectly normal Khajiit family in Elsweyr.

carrotsforferrets:

people (and bethesda, jesus christ) tend to forget that according to the lore, there are multiple types of Khajiiti. We only typically see the Suthay-Rhats, but Khajit can be born with multiple levels of feline appearance dependent on the moon cycle they are born under. On one end of the spectrum you have some Khajiit who look practically like Bosmer with cat whiskers, and on the other end you have Khajiit who legit just look like housecats but still have sentience and intelligence. For instance, this would be considered to be a perfectly normal Khajiit family in Elsweyr.

(via huntingmyths)

gemlikegemstone:

theticklishpear replied to your post “do you ever start thinking/feeling/doing something crazy and you know…”

Exactly how I feel about the time I threw a bubble party in the elevator of my dorm building, complete with bubble machine and bottles for each person that came on.

That sounds awesome though

During the two hours I held the party, the doors opened on a couple people on the second floor getting on to go to class and there was an RA and he said, “You can’t do that.”

"Oh? How come? I’ll stop if you need me to."

"You’re not leaving enough space for a wheelchair. That’s what elevators are for, you know."

"There’s space." I shifted some things some more so that even if it were just me and a couple others, there’d be space for a wheelchair.

"No, you don’t understand. You can’t do that."

"Really, there’s plenty of space for somebody, and I’ll get out if they need me to. I’m not causing any trouble."

"You need to—" The elevator closed in the middle of his sentence. I continued the party and when it made another stop on the second floor a few minutes later, he wasn’t there. We rocked on for another hour after that.

and yes, i cleaned up the soap afterward so people wouldn’t slip. i throw very considerate parties.

It’s the first week of October, the very beginning of the official planning month for NaNoWriMo! When I asked if you guys would be interested in some posts this month, I received more likes than responses, and several reblogs without comments, so I’m going to assume those mean you’re alright with it. Let’s get started, then!

What is NaNoWriMo anyway?

It stands for National Novel Writing Month. The project started in 1999 in the San Francisco Bay Area with 21 people writing with utter abandon in July. This year the project will turn sixteen with more than 310,000 participants, and is run by the same people, just with a non-profit status, a global reach, and a branch for K-12 classrooms called the Young Writers Program.

But what do you do during NaNoWriMo?

Though the project held its first challenge in July, it has since been moved to the month of November. Starting on the 1st and ending at 11:59 PM on the 30th, participants attempt to write 50,000 words of novel. With the website to help you track your progress, verify your word count, and give you forums to meet people and procrastinate terribly, there’s a huge support system in place for writers who may not have support in those surrounding them in every day life.

How long have you been doing it?

I believe I first heard about the event from casuallyconflicted, whom I sat next to in 8th grade. (omg we’re old now) He’s an amazing writer that I looked up to enough to create the first creative writing club that school had ever had, and he was my most constant attendee. I tried NaNo that year and failed miserably, finishing with less than 7,000 words. I’ve moved several times since then (and actually I’m certain he has, too), and I’ve participated ever since. From 2003-2014, there have only been two years that I have not written a truly terrible book in the month of November, and those were due to starting college and several interpersonal issues going on at the time. This year, I’ll be giving it my best try with a new, full-time work position, so I’ll need your encouragement sometimes, too.

What’s your story?

After completing the core classes required for graduation in college, I began my creative writing emphasis courses, which I had been looking forward to the entire time I sat through math and computer programming classes and all the other terrible things I took. I always excelled in creative writing courses in high school, and I knew these would be just as enjoyable. During my fiction course, we were given an assignment to write a 10-20 page complete short story. I ended up with a story I felt extraordinarily confident about, confident in the character, confident (mostly) in the execution, everything. It came back as an F. My professor, a multi-published author, pulled me aside after class and said, “I could not grade this as following the assignment’s guidelines. You were asked to write a complete story. This is an excerpt. This story isn’t done. You need to write the rest of it. I need to read the rest of it.” That’s how I ended up with my current passion, the Moonwater Series. I wrote book one, Crystal Combat, in 2011; book two, Daelysian Dreams, in 2012; and the first half of book three, The Archives of Baellor’da, during last year’s event.

Come join me as I muddle through the second half of book three this year! My username is Emea, and I welcome any and all who would like to add me as a writing buddy. Nothing is better than writing with friends.