A coerced member of the House-Elf Liberation Front and the Society for the Protection of Elfish Welfare.
fashionsfromhistory:

Woman’s Semi Formal Domestic Overcoat
Early 1900s
Qing Dynasty

In early 1900, it became fashionable for young brides to wear pastel shades on their wedding day, instead of the customary red-color garments. A narrower silhouette for jackets and the sleeves became fashionable, and front closures replaced right-side closure of the earlier period.

IMA

fashionsfromhistory:

Woman’s Semi Formal Domestic Overcoat

Early 1900s

Qing Dynasty

In early 1900, it became fashionable for young brides to wear pastel shades on their wedding day, instead of the customary red-color garments. A narrower silhouette for jackets and the sleeves became fashionable, and front closures replaced right-side closure of the earlier period.

IMA

(via applescrumper)

maxkirin:

Hello, dear followers!

It is with great excitement that I finally reveal… WRITERS UNITE! A book by writers, and for writers. Made with the help of over 200 Tumblr Writers, compiled by yours truly, and with a cover by the fantastic Plaguesworth!

Best of all, though, this book is available for FREE!!!

What exactly is this eBook about? Well, here’s the gist of it:

WRITERS UNITE! is a book of writing advice, inspiration, and tips. Over 200 Tumblr authors answered the question:

"What is the one piece of advice you wish you would’ve known when you first got started writing?"

This FREE eBook is a compilation of their writing advice, and their stories. You can have access to this nexus — this fountain of knowledge — at no cost whatsoever. Take it, learn, and drink with us!

When writers unite, great things happen~ ♥︎

(via chasingredrabbits)

riallasheng replied to your post “Alright… I was researching slash-and-burn methods as well as looking at areas where natural fires were PART of the ecosystem (such as the Everglades, many forest types, and the great plains,etc…) and I’ve been trying to see if I could work up a culture that used this natural fire cycle as part of their crop rotation/field care. I THINK it would work, but it is very hard to find unbiased sources on slash and burn or even natural fire cycle ecosystems… so… please, educe more rapture^^”

No it did. These are all things that I knew, but it is so helpful to see it all together like this^^ I wasn’t planning on it being a yearly thing, but instead a natural part of the ecology that they used in conjuction with crop/livestock rotation^^

Oh yeah, definitely. You could so do that. As long as your culture has safeguards for keeping it from getting out of control and secondary subsistence means, you’re a-okay, good to go, and it is a great idea. A side note, too: Your culture would be embracing the natural fire cycle, and frequently pieces of subsistence methods find their way into religion. With a thing like this that’s more than likely triggered by a lightning strike, it would almost certainly have lore (even if ancient and no longer considered “the truth of the matter”) attached to it, and probably even religious connotations. It might be fun to play with that a little in some religious symbolism, or even so far as a worship ceremony. Of course all of that depends on your culture, the technology level, and how complex the society is, but it’d be interesting to think about.

riallasheng asked: Alright... I was researching slash-and-burn methods as well as looking at areas where natural fires were PART of the ecosystem (such as the Everglades, many forest types, and the great plains,etc...) and I've been trying to see if I could work up a culture that used this natural fire cycle as part of their crop rotation/field care. I THINK it would work, but it is very hard to find unbiased sources on slash and burn or even natural fire cycle ecosystems... so... please, educe more rapture^^

(Sorry, this will get wordy, but I want to address all things in this post.)

First, a definition - slash-and-burn is an agricultural & horticultural technique used mostly in the tropics that involves cutting down natural vegetation, burning it where it lies, planting in the new “mulch,” then allowing the forest to take the area back over with new growth. The cycle is repeated. The reason this is done mostly in the tropics is because the soil is INTENSELY acidic, which means that it doesn’t hold many nutrients, especially the nutrients needed for planting crops. The burning creates a new layer of rich top soil in which to plant.

The idea of slash-and-burn isn’t particularly looked well upon because of the risk of the fire getting out-of-hand, however this happens rarely since the cultures using the technique aren’t new to it and have developed safeguards and are always prepared to put out the fire if needed, and if it gets a little too big, it’s just a bigger plot of land.

This is where using the natural fire cycle can become an issue. You are totally right in that there are plenty of sources that talk about the benefits reaped from natural fires—take some types of tree seeds, for instance, which only release from the tree and open in intense heat. Without the natural fire cycle, some forests would become overcrowded and the older trees would actually kill out the newer trees and any undergrowth. The fire cycle keeps things from getting out of control. What a fabulous idea for a culture to harness that and use it to their advantage.

The biggest problem I can foresee with it being a cultural dependent is that it doesn’t happen on command. When your culture is ready to plant again in the new year, they may not (or may, depending on if you plan to have magic) be able to call down the lightning strike required for the fire to start. Without some supplemental slash-and-burn on their part, it wouldn’t happen frequently enough to be their sole means. Unless they live in a particularly lightning-ridden, predictable-storms type of area. That’s always a possibility.

Don’t forget to have a contingency plan. If a natural fire cycle strikes and your people aren’t prepared to contain it, it could very easily get out of hand and kill your people. Not to mention that it’s not exactly a place-predictive sort of occurrence. You may not want your garden in the middle of the forest. Maybe you wanted it closer. Maybe it’s on the edge of a mountain that is a pain to get to. Who knows, maybe it’s smack-dab in the middle of town. Just be aware of the limitations, work with them, and you could certainly make that work with some supplemental actions.

(JFC, I’m sorry. I hope that helped.)

riallasheng replied to your post “Subsistence Methods and Economy”

…Pardon me while I gaze in rapture… This is GLORIOUS and I will avidly watch this! Much of it I know, but it is so nice to see if compiled together with things that I am still learning or did not know/only knew the basics of!!! ^^

This tickles my heart! I’m so glad to be able to lay out some information in a way that is perhaps more understandable, or with things you may not have known or thought about. If there’s any specific topic you’d like to hear more about in terms of anthropology (you say “still learning”—are you taking anthropology courses?), world- or culture-building, feel free to ask. I literally ruined two dinners in a row by talking about medieval medicine, the foundations of civilizations, and why the proto-Irish didn’t collapse under their massive deforestation like so many other ancient cultures did. Anth is one of my favorite topics, so if you need help or are curious about something, let me know!